Jurassic World

Cast: Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, Vincent D’Onofrio, Ty Simpkins, Nick Robinson, Omar Sy, BD Wong, Irrfan Khan

Director: Colin Trevorrow

Writers: Rick Jaffa, Amanda Silver, Derek Connolly, Colin Trevorrow


Jurassic World is a film that has a lot to live up to. Its predecessor Jurassic Park is a universally beloved and acclaimed film that pretty much sets the standard for what a perfect summer blockbuster should be. It was fun, it was exciting and it gave the audience something that they had never seen before. This film is so affectionately regarded by most who have seen it that the audience expectation for this follow-up was a complex mixture of hopeful anticipation and callous scepticism. I think that just about everyone waiting to see this film wants to like it, but we have been burnt twice before. Therefore it’s easy to have our reactions clouded by our desires to both love and hate this film. I personally expected this film to fall somewhere in the middle, not amazing but not terrible either. In the end what I expected was mostly what I got but the film also did something that I wasn’t expecting at all, something I’ll get back to later. I don’t think this film lived up to the original (and perhaps it never could) but I still had fun watching it and think it is a worthy sequel.

Many years after the incident in the original film, the park is now open, is fully functional, and is a huge success. However the park’s popularity is waning as people are starting to get bored of dinosaurs, a temperament that I felt was very true to the spirit of this age. Therefore the park’s manager Clare Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard) and the owner Simon Masrani (Irrfan Khan) hope to invigorate public interest by using gene-splicing to create new breeds of dinosaurs. Meanwhile Vic Hoskins (Vincent D’Onofrio), the head of InGen security, comes to the park and proposes that the dinosaurs be trained as military weapons. He is rebuked by Owen (Chris Pratt), a raptor trainer who maintains that dinosaurs cannot be tamed or controlled but are instead fierce and intelligent creatures that can only be approached through a relationship of mutual respect. Shortly after Clare’s nephews Zach (Nick Robinson) and Gray (Ty Simpkins) arrive at the park, chaos ensues when the new genetically engineered Indominus rex escapes from captivity and wreaks havoc across the entire island.

This is a flawed film, there’s no getting around that. The characters for the most part are pretty basic and underdeveloped. Clare in particular is very uninspired as an uptight, frigid woman who gets a lot of flack from the film despite being smart, independent and successful. Owen is essentially the only character to even be given a story-arc as he seeks to understand the nature of the dinosaurs and what sort of relationships human beings can share with them. The story is a bit sketchy but I do think it works considering the type of film Jurassic World is trying to be. There are plenty of holes and flaws to criticise but there are also some clever ideas that I felt redeemed many of the film’s misgivings. The best parts of the film are the action scenes involving the dinosaurs. These scenes are fun to watch, they’re ripe with tension and they’re even executed in new and creative ways as opposed to recycling the sequences from the original film. It could be argued that the film goes overboard sometimes (one character death springs to mind that felt to me like overkill) but I was still very much entertained by what I saw.

However what really astounded me was that this film did something I did not expect at all. It actually felt like a Jurassic Park film. It actually captured the same sense of awe and wonder, the same balance of violence and playfulness and the same epic scale as the original classic, albeit to a much lesser extent. The characters are not as memorable, the tension is not as palpable and the sense of wonder is not as astonishing, but the feeling is still there. There is a lot in this film that contributes towards capturing this effect such as the inclusion of the John Williams theme and the allusions towards the events of the original film. More than anything though it is the visual spectacle that was able to convey the sense of grandeur and wonderment that the first film had originally created. It may not have been as strong or as potent as what Jurassic Park created but it nevertheless gave this film a certain dimension that made it feel like part of a bigger whole. It was this dimension that inspired my inner child’s nostalgia and whimsicality and that gradually drew me into this film.

I get the feeling that the audience’s reaction to this film is going to be very much split. Those who have seen Jurassic Park are inevitably going to hold it as the definitive standard, a standard to which this film does not ultimately measure up. Whether or not they feel Jurassic World holds up as a worthy sequel depends on what they expect from it. Those who expect this film to measure up to the quality of the first film (or, dare I say, surpass it) will be disappointed. Those who are looking for a fun and entertaining film that captures the same tone as the original, even if it is to a lesser extent, will I think be satisfied. I’d like to think that younger children who perhaps have not seen the original film might be able to experience that same sensation of awe and wonder that the first film inspired. However the film does make a point of how dinosaurs have ceased to be a sensation and that children are no longer awe-struck by them. I suspect that this comment is an allusion to the state of films in general where CGI blockbusters have become such a norm that the visual spectacles they create hardly even register with viewers anymore. Gone are the days when Jurassic Park was the biggest and most breathtaking film of its kind and where CGI dinosaurs were the most incredible visual simulations imaginable. Even though films with new and innovative ideas are still being offered, Hollywood has reached a stage where it has all (to a certain extent) been done before. It is small wonder then that Jurassic World has found it so difficult to distinguish itself this summer.

★★★

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