The Finest Hours

Cast: Chris Pine, Casey Affleck, Ben Foster, Holliday Grainger, John Ortiz, Eric Bana

Director: Craig Gillespie

Writers: Eric Johnson, Scott Silver, Paul Tamasy


This is the kind of film that I’ve always found to be the most difficult to review. The Finest Hours is not a complicated film. It has a simple story that gets told in a straightforward manner. It is not an artistically ambitious film either nor does it tackle any challenging or difficult themes. Therefore, as far as deconstructing and interpreting the story goes, the film does not pose any particular challenge. It also isn’t a particularly surprising film and did not provoke any sort of a notable emotional reaction out of me. It is on the whole an adequate film with writing, directing and acting that is perfectly serviceable. That’s the problem. I have found this film to be so overwhelmingly average that I can hardly think of anything to write about it. Just about every element of this film that I can think of can be summarised by the word ‘fine’. It is difficult to write anything substantial on a subject that does not provoke any strong feelings from you whether they be positive or negative. For the sake of the word count though I’ll have to try.

The story is that of the 1952 rescue of the SS Pendleton, a real-life event that is still remembered today as the greatest rescue mission in the history of the United States Coast Guard. The SS Pendleton is torn in half during a fierce storm and the surviving crewmembers have to work out a plan to survive until the rescue crew can reach them. Ray Sybert (Casey Affleck), the ship’s engineer, uses his knowledge of the vessel to keep her afloat for as long as possible. Meanwhile the Chief Warrant Officer Daniel Cluff (Eric Bana) orders that a rescue mission be carried out by Bernie Webber (Chris Pine), a young but talented coast guard still feeling the weight of his last failed mission. This operation requires Bernie and his crew, including the hardened seaman Richard Livesey (Ben Foster) to cross a bar that is perilous and difficult to navigate even in the most ideal weather conditions. As Bernie embarks on what many consider to be a suicide mission, his fiancé Miriam (Holliday Grainger) prays for his safe return.

I wish there was more of substance I could offer to this review but there really isn’t much more to say. This movie is fine and that’s about it. The film hits the beats that it needs to, showing the stories of both the rescue team as they make their way to the ship and of the crewmembers in their struggle to remain alive. Characters and motivations are sufficiently established, the conflicts and tension are passable enough and the major plot points are all given the suitable amount of coverage required. It doesn’t offer anything new or surprising but it also isn’t exactly bland or substandard. I wasn’t actively invested in the fate of these characters or in the outcome of their mission but I also wasn’t wholly indifferent to them. The film goes where it needs to go and it does what it needs to do.

The cast does well for the most part. Chris Pine plays a different sort of character from his usual as this shy, quiet, unconfident who is basically everything that Captain Kirk is not. Holliday Grainger looks like she really belongs in the 50s setting and does well enough as a wilful and assertive woman tackling the dilemma of marrying a man whose job could very well kill him. Ben Foster gives what is probably the strongest performance in this film as this haggard sea veteran taking on a job that his gut tells him cannot be done. Even after seeing him in Six Feet Under and the National Theatre’s recent production of A Streetcar Named Desire, I often forget how good he is at being brooding and intense. Eric Bana on the other hand gives the weakest performance playing what is by far the film’s most one-dimensional character. He is basically this uptight, inexpert authority figure who is an outsider to the community and doesn’t understand how this job is really done.

There really isn’t much more to say. The Finest Hours is an average film that did not leave any notable impression on me. It is a feel-good based-on-a-true-story film (the kind that your mum likes) that goes exactly where you think it will go. It is a decently executed film that manages to convey the feelings that it needs to convey but not much else. I enjoyed it while I was watching it and have barely thought about it since. Disney didn’t seem to have much faith in this movie and barely put any effort into advertising it, probably because they’re more focused on promoting movies like The Force Awakens and Captain America: Civil War. It seems like with all of these massive and highly publicised blockbusters in the works, this was essentially the movie that slipped between the cracks. For what it’s worth it is a decent picture, but the fact that Disney did not show any strong support for it doesn’t really surprise me.

★★★

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