Deadpool

Cast: Ryan Reynolds, Morena Baccarin, Ed Skrein, T.J. Miller, Gina Carano, Leslie Uggams, Brianna Hildebrand, Stefan Kapičić

Director: Tim Miller

Writers: Rhett Reese, Paul Wernick


In this day and age when every second blockbuster coming out at any given time is yet another superhero movie, it isn’t hard to understand why some audiences are becoming wearied with superhero fatigue. This is why Deadpool feels like such an invigorating breath of fresh air. There isn’t a single superhero movie out there quite like it. It took a character that most audiences were unfamiliar with and portrayed him using a style that defied the family-friendly thrills of the Marvel movies and the dark, gritty action of the DC movies. This is a film that was uninterested in forced tie-ins to other movies, studio-mandated content and PG-13 audience appeal. The Deadpool crew was focused above all on making a good movie that was true to the source material and that is exactly what they made. It is not kid-friendly and it is not inoffensive; it is the gory, sweary, indecent movie that Ryan Reynolds and Tim Miller set out to make.

Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) is a mercenary with a relentlessly twisted sense of humour who finds his perfect match in the equally depraved Vanessa Carlysle (Morena Baccarin). Shortly after proposing to her however, Wade is diagnosed with terminal cancer and decides he doesn’t want to put her through the ordeal of watching him die. Upon leaving Vanessa, Wade is approached by a mysterious figure who claims that his employer can cure him. This employer turns out to be Ajax (Ed Skrein), a scientist and weapons expert whose experiments subject Wade to an agonising and prolonged period of torture. Wade eventually escapes and discovers that he has acquired enhanced strength and reflexes as well as a healing factor but has also been left horribly disfigured. Adopting an alias as the masked vigilante Deadpool, Wade embarks on a campaign of revenge to track down Ajax and have his disfigurement cured.

What sets this movie apart from every other superhero movie is its wicked sense of humour. From the very beginning all the way to the end, Deadpool is packed with dark humour, fourth wall breaks, over-the-top violence, excessive profanity and visual gags that puts most American comedies out there to shame. At the centre of it all is Ryan Reynolds killing it as the character he has been waiting his whole life to play. He is energetic, charismatic and hilarious as this character and is wholly committed to representing him. Reynolds is an actor I’ve often struggled to go along with, so I’m happy to see that he’s finally found a role that allows him to truly flourish. Deadpool is a supremely entertaining character who perfectly matches the film’s excessive, sporadic, almost cartoonish tone who is at his best when he jumps all over the place dropping F-bombs, slicing heads off and making the most hysterically inappropriate comments possible. I also greatly enjoyed the romance between Wade and Vanessa who share a vibrant chemistry. Their relationship is weird, crazy and unconventional, but it works for them and proves to be quite touching.

Even though Deadpool is identified above all as being a superhero movie, the superhero parts were actually the ones I enjoyed the least. More than anything else it was the humour that made this movie for me. Therefore whenever the film chose to be serious and advance the whole revenge storyline that was taking place, I became less interested. I got that the film needed a villain and conflict in order to progress, but it still felt a little stale to me. Whenever a serious scene came along, it felt to me like a 5-10 minute expository segment I had to sit through in order to get to the good part. It didn’t help that the main villain Ajax was utterly bland and forgettable. The action itself was a lot of fun to watch as it fully embraced its R rating and allowed room for much humour, but I think the comedy may have somewhat overshadowed the excitement.

Deadpool is the exact kind of movie that needed to be made with the blockbuster climate the way that it is. Made with a minimal budget and a surplus of creative freedom, this film has shown definitively that superhero movies do not need to be huge in order to be good and do not need to be all-inclusive in order to be successful. Deadpool is coarse, uncouth, unrefined and unapologetic. It is exactly the movie that it wants to be and is a great pleasure to watch for any viewer not put off by its dark, gimmicky humour or its comically extreme use of violence. My only big issue with the movie is that I found it to be more humourous than I found it to be thrilling. Still, the humour is more than enough to make this an enjoyable movie as it takes just as much pleasure in laughing at itself as it does in laughing at the dozens of other superhero movies that have taken over Hollywood. At the very least, it is certainly a step up from X-Men Origins: Wolverine.

★★★★

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