Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again

Cast: Amanda Seyfried, Lily James, Christine Baranski, Julie Walters, Pierce Brosnan, Colin Firth, Stellan Skarsgård, Dominic Cooper, Andy Garcia, Cher, Meryl Streep

Director: Ol Parker

Writer: Ol Parker


I really don’t want to be that guy. I know that this movie wasn’t made for me. I know that the people it was made for love it to bits. I know that I’m the boring spoilsport at the karaoke party who’s sulking in the corner while everybody else is singing, dancing and having tremendous fun. I know that the movie is fully aware of how silly, cheesy and imperfect it is and embraces it all with total zeal and complete shamelessness. This is a movie without pretension or delusions of grandeur; there is no artistry to be dissected and scrutinised, no hidden truths or deeper meanings to be unearthed, and no profound or introspective thoughts or feelings to be taken away so that people like me can flex their movie critic muscles. All this movie wants is for you to lay back, let your hair down, open your mind and just laugh, sing along and embrace the joy, the glam and the ABBA of it all. Believe me, I get it. And I hated it all the same.

I really don’t want to be the guy who hates Mamma Mia. I like ABBA. And I like musicals. And I like many of the actors involved, both new and returning. But watching these movies is like being a teetotal introvert alone at a boozy music festival, even the most honest attempt to embrace the discomforting noise and clutter and humour the chaotic revelry is going to leave you drained from the monotony and effort. ‘Then why would you even bother going?’ you might ask. Well, I came for the music but, instead of ABBA, I got the amateur cover band made up of X-Factor rejects. What followed was a song-and-dance cataclysm that got more unbearable with every flat note, every clumsy dance routine and every obnoxiously garish sound and visual. I know that the goofiness and crudeness is kind of the point and for many it is part of the film’s charm, but all I can think about was how swept away I was by The Greatest Showman. Like Mamma Mia, that movie was stupid, clichéd and corny as hell but it was all done with such passion, creativity and honest-to-god effort by such a talented team (including actors who can actually sing and dance) that I couldn’t help but be charmed. What I find most grating about the Mamma Mia movies above all else is how feckless and insincere the whole thing feels.

Here We Go Again is pretty much everything I loathed about the first film sans Meryl Streep (who wasn’t all that great in the first place; she barely hit a note in ‘The Winner Takes It All’ and deserves far more attention for her heartfelt rendition of ‘Slipping Through My Fingers’). Donna has died and her loss has left a gaping hole in the lives of those who lived on that idyllic Greek island with her. Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) is working to re-open the inn in her mother’s honour (having renamed it the Hotel Bella Donna) and is frantic as the opening night approaches and she’s trying to put the finishing touches on the big party she’s planning. Her mother’s friends Tanya (Christine Baranski) and Rosie (Julie Walters) arrive to show their support and share with her stories of the Donna they knew as a young woman back when she looked like Lily James (James, with her sunny presence and decent singing voice, is one of the film’s better qualities). In these flashbacks we are treated to the tale of how the free-spirited Donna first came to the island back in the groovy 70s, made it her home, and on the way met and slept with the three men who may or may not be Sophie’s father: the bashful Harry (Hugh Skinner), the adventurous Bill (Josh Dylan) and the dashing Sam (Jeremy Irvine), standing in for Colin Firth, Stellan Skarsgård and Pierce Brosnan respectively.

Having used up most of ABBA’s most recognisable hits in the first film, Here We Go Again scrapes the barrel for whatever overlooked tracks and B-songs it can find to shoehorn into the story. We’re first introduced to young Donna as she sings ‘When I Kissed the Teacher’, a song that’s sure to get a staff member at her university sacked, we get young Harry singing about how sleeping with Donna would be his ‘Waterloo’ (whatever that means), and we’re treated to a version of ‘Knowing Me, Knowing You’ that isn’t nearly as dramatic as it should be in that moment due to Irvine’s atonal voice (which, if nothing else, is at least consistent with Brosnan’s performance). Most of these musical numbers are forgettable; the more memorable performances tend to be those that replay hits from the first film including ‘Dancing Queen’ and ‘Super Trouper’. And still, even at their most elaborate, the staging and choreography in these scenes is so conventional and uninspired they fall far short of the extravaganza that an ABBA musical ought to be. And then there’s Cher who enters the scene dressed all in white, radiating like a beacon of light just when you thought all hope was lost, to sing ‘Fernando’ with Andy Garcia. She barely adds anything to the story and the choreography is still too lacklustre and restrained for a star with her presence and energy, but damn did it feel good to listen to someone who could sing for a change.

Given how fantastically difficult it is for any film of any kind to be made, I don’t like accusing filmmakers of being lazy. Very few, if any, go into this industry because they want to make an easy buck. However if the effort that went into a film is not self-evident, it’s difficult for me to feel like any care or passion went into its making. This is what I was getting at when I said the film felt feckless and insincere. It feels like nobody, either in front or behind the camera, saw this movie as anything more than an excuse to spend a few weeks in sunny Greece and get a paycheque out of it. It feels like the filmmakers knew the movie would make money no matter what so they just didn’t care enough to try and turn it into something special; to cast actors who can sing and dance, to push the limits of what’s possible in the spectacles they can produce, to write a story that has something meaningful to say about love and heartbreak, youth and growth, joy and sadness, and the many other things ABBA used to sing about. That they had fun together is clear, but the fun isn’t infectious because there’s no personal or emotional investment in anything that’s happening on screen.

Based on the reception these films have received, it’s clear that my opinion is in the minority. It looks like many, many people are perfectly happy to watch A-List stars who can barely hold a tune belt out catchy pop songs in bell bottoms and jumpsuits and there’s not much I can really say to that. There’s for sure something to be said for joyful escapism, which isn’t something I would begrudge anybody in this day and age. What’s more, it seems that some of the things I vehemently dislike about Mamma Mia are amongst the very reasons why people find it so charming and lovable and there is no criticism I can make that will change how they see the film. These movies clearly do something that works for a large and diverse audience and if I don’t know what it is by this point I doubt I ever will. As someone who didn’t have any patience for the tangential subplots and musical scenes that detracted from the story, the blandly delivered songs and tediously repetitive format, and the derivative and empty plot that manages to go absolutely nowhere, this movie was exhausting. The only thing I took away from Mamma Mia was a headache.

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Warcraft: The Beginning

Cast: Travis Fimmel, Paula Patton, Ben Foster, Dominic Cooper, Toby Kebbell, Ben Schnetzer, Robert Kazinsky, Daniel Wu

Director: Duncan Jones

Writers: Charles Leavitt, Duncan Jones


I didn’t play much of the Warcraft games growing up. I gave World of Warcraft a go when I was 14 or 15 but never got into it the way some of my friends did. My knowledge of this universe with its expansive history and lore was thus little better than one being introduced to Warcraft for the very first time. Adapting such a universe into a movie franchise is tricky. There’s so much to share and yet so little space in which to include it. Sometimes introducing an audience to a world of magic, myth and adventure can be as simple as starting with “a long time ago in a galaxy far away”, but there are still many movies that make the mistake of dumping exposition or failing to establish their own rules. The Lord of the Rings trilogy however proved that such an adaptation can work. And so, considering the story this film wanted to tell and the space in which it had to tell it, I think that Warcraft: The Beginning did a pretty decent job.

The orc world of Draenor is being destroyed by a mysterious force called fel magic, and so the orcs must search for a new home under the leadership of the warlock Gul’dan (Daniel Wu). They enter the world of Azeroth through a portal and begin their colonisation campaign by raiding human settlements. Anduin Lothar (Travis Fimmel), the military leader of Stormwind, is sent to deal with these raids and ends up meeting the mage Khadgar (Ben Schnetzer). He tells him that he has found traces of fel magic in their world, leading Anduin to call a meeting with Llane Wrynn (Dominic Cooper), the king of Stormwind. Llane sends Anduin and Khadgar to find Medivh (Ben Foster), the Guardian of Tirisfal, hoping that he might hold the knowledge they seek. Their investigation soon leads them to Garona (Paul Patton), a half-orc warrior who pledges herself to Stormwind. Meanwhile Durotan (Toby Kebbell), orc chieftain of the Frostwolf Clan, starts to believe that Gul’dan’s channelling of fel magic is too dangerous and will cause Azeroth to suffer the same fate as Draenor. He therefore tries to reach out to the humans to form an alliance for the sake of both of their peoples.

One of the movie’s weaknesses is the sheer abundance of names and places that the audience is expected to remember while following this story. 30-45 minutes into the movie I was still trying to sort out who was who and what was happening where. Once I had a basic idea of all these things though I found that I was actually rather engaged by the story. It was difficult to keep track of but when it finally came down to the final battle I was both interested and invested. While the intricacies of the plot could be distracting and messy, I was still drawn into the larger story being told about two vastly different cultures struggling to overcome their differences in order to face a greater threat. The obstacles and perceptions that have to be overcome are great, perhaps insurmountable, and this film simply lays the groundwork for what will be a much larger conflict told over successive chapters. To that end I think the movie is satisfactory. It may not have astounded me the way it wanted to but I am interested in seeing what comes next.

One aspect of the games that this film has down to a tee is the look. From the different species and creatures to the cities and landscapes right down to the oversized armour and mystical auras, this game looks exactly like the World of Warcraft that I remember. Although the visuals do have a tendency to look cartoony, I think that can be forgiven in an adaptation of a video game franchise with a cartoony design. The area where the film probably struggles the most is with its characters. While I didn’t find them to be badly written or acted, there were just too many for the film to keep track of. There were a few standouts like Kebbell as Durotan, the orc who believes his people are losing their way, and Patton as Garona, who feels torn between two different cultures that both regard her as an outsider. The rest of the characters left large enough impressions that I could remember who was who, but that’s about all they did.

I think it’s fair to say that I liked Warcraft: The Beginning more than I expected to. It is messy and it is overstuffed with characters and plot details but not to the extent that I couldn’t enjoy the film. Once I got past the stage of working out what exactly was going on, I was able to enjoy it for the epic fantasy adventure that it wants to be. For those like myself who are not intimately familiar with the games and their universe, the film is not inaccessible to them. So far as I can recall there are not any excessive exposition dumps to scavenge through, no confusing plot developments that only make sense if you’ve done your homework and no gratuitous fan service that gets in the way. Warcraft: The Beginning isn’t a film that will have you deeply invested in its compelling characters or blown away by the massive scale and scope of its action like The Lord of the Rings did. However it is a fun and sometimes thrilling movie with neat visuals that has piqued my interest enough for me to return for the next instalment.

★★★