The Predator

Cast: Boyd Holbrook, Trevante Rhodes, Jacob Tremblay, Keegan-Michael Key, Olivia Munn, Thomas Jane, Alfie Allen, Sterling K. Brown

Director: Shane Black

Writers: Fred Dekker, Shane Black


There’s a moment in the third act of The Predator I keep returning to that aptly demonstrates the movie’s fatal flaw. It’s when the hulking Predator ambushes the rag-tag group of misfit heroes in the middle of a forest. One major character, played by one of the movie’s top-billed actors, attempts to use a repurposed alien weapon against the fiend, only to accidentally incinerate himself instead. The problem with this scene is that I had absolutely no idea it had even happened. It wasn’t until a later scene, as soon as I had noticed that the character in question was missing, that I realised he had been killed. Even then, I hadn’t a clue how it had happened. The scene was so shrouded in darkness and edited so awkwardly, it was all but impossible to make heads or tails of anything during that ambush. The only reason I now know the manner of this character’s death at all is because I read the movie’s synopsis on Wikipedia in preparation for writing this review. That’s what it all comes down to; the movie’s problem isn’t just that the story makes no sense or that the characters feel underdeveloped or that the tone is so inconsistent, it’s that filmmaking is so grossly incompetent for a director whom I know knows how to make a coherent, entertaining film.

Shane Black has made several choices in making this film that could be regarded as questionable, not least of which was casting a mate he knew to be a registered sex offender in a minor part and neglecting to tell his cast, and it baffles me that the director of Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, Iron Man 3 and The Nice Guys could make a movie this inept. It feels like there was originally a four-hour cut of the movie that somebody attacked with a machete in the editing room, so haphazard are the action sequences. It certainly doesn’t help that most of the scenes are shot at night with a bland colour scheme that makes the mise-en-scéne look largely muddled to the viewer’s eye. The constant, aimless editing however is what makes it so difficult to keep track of the visual geography and the driving actions behind the individual shots to the point that an important development happened before my very eyes without me even noticing. This isn’t the only time this happens either. There are dozens of story gaps and optical blurs scattered throughout the story, most of which would not be in and of themselves detrimental to the film had they been isolated occurrences. That they are constantly happening throughout the film means that they add up and contribute towards creating a hectically chaotic viewing experience.

The plot is similarly disjointed with entire story beats that whiz by so quickly, you’ll wonder whether you dozed off for a few minutes and just woke up. Things kick off when a Predator spaceship crash-lands on Earth. Army sniper Quinn McKenna (Boyd Holbrook) encounters the surviving Predator and his whole unit is wiped out. He escapes with some of the alien’s technology and, convinced he’ll need to keep the evidence out of the government’s hands lest they take him in and try to silence him, he mails the Predator’s mask and wrist cannon to his home in the suburbs. Only it’s not really his home these days. Quinn’s estranged wife Emily (Yvonne Strahovski) lives there with their autistic son Rory (Jacob Tremblay). Rory, a troubled kid who gets bullied at school but also a prodigy, discovers the content of his father’s package and is soon able to work out how the technology works. In the process however he accidentally summons a group of Predators, a scouting party in search of the equipment’s original owner, to his hometown where R-rated havoc is soon to ensue.

Quinn meanwhile is taken into custody by the government, whose plan is to lock him up with all the other undesirables and throw away the keys. Thus he ends up with a crew up of weirdoes and ne’er-do-wells who all have similar problems with rules and authority figures. There’s the insubordinate Nebraska (Tervante Rhodes), the verbal diarrhoeic Coyle (Keegan-Michael Key), the foul-mouthed (because he has Tourrete syndrome) Baxley (Thomas Jane), the British Lynch (Alfie Allen) and the awkward conversationalist Nettles (Augusto Aguilera). As he’s being dealt with, famed biologist Dr. Casey Bracket (Olivia Munn) comes to the facility to study the captured Predator under the direction of government agent Will Traeger (Sterling K. Brown). The Predator breaks free and slaughters its way out of the lab. Quinn and the Loonies take advantage of the chaos to team up and make their own escape, picking up Dr. Bracket on the way, and make for Quinn’s family home so that they can collect the equipment and plan their next move. There they learn that Rory has gone out with the Predator’s armour and that the alien hunter is hot on his trail. R-rated havoc ensues.

The movie takes several leaps in getting us from Point A to Point B to Point C and such leaps are usually permissible in movies when they skimp over minor details without much bearing over the plot and allow room for the audience to catch up. Watching The Predator though is like trying to keep up with a runaway train blindfolded. While the movie does oftentimes leave out details that contribute nothing to the story and would otherwise serve to pad the runtime, there are other leaps that omit fundamental story and character details that are never made clear to us. The movie’s failure is its inability to distinguish between the two. For example, one inconsequential leap in the story takes place when most of the characters have fled to a barn and are planning their next move. A group is sent out to explore a little and the next time we see them is when they arrive in an RV to rescue everybody else from the danger that’s just caught up with them. Where did they get the RV? We never find out and, while slightly distracting, we honestly don’t really need to know; we can use our own imaginations to figure that one out. But then we later realise that two of the characters share a certain bromantic relationship that was never made clear and it feels like the movie skipped a scene or two somewhere along the way that would have established this point. These two characters are so poorly established that I wasn’t even sure if they were genuinely supposed to come across as a gay couple (which would have been awesome considering that gung-ho army renegades are never allowed to be gay) or as simply brothers in arms.

This is an issue that most of these characters suffer from. The movie operates under the impression that these are all fully fleshed-out characters whose fates we are supposed to be invested in yet never puts in the time for establishment and development, opting instead for dirty one-liners and banter. Olivia Munn’s Dr. Bracket more or less wanders into the film without any kind of introduction and simply goes straight down to business as if we’re supposed to already know what her personality and motivation is. I now know this to be the consequence of Shane Black cutting out her introduction as it took place in the scene that had Munn paired up with Steve Wilder Striegel, the friend who was convicted some years ago for making sexual advances at a 14-year-old girl. This part of the movie was quickly and indiscriminately cut out in response to Munn’s justified outrage and the backlash she inspired and the consequence is that her character gets the short shrift. Her story kicks off without the set-up it needs to get started and it is only through Munn’s talents that any semblance of character comes through in the end. That this edit, the consequence of Black’s poor judgement in his casting decision and the studio’s seeming ignorance, was done so hastily and carelessly and affects the overall story so fundamentally is symptomatic I think of just how slapdash the whole movie feels.

This is all a huge shame because on paper Shane Black would appear to be the perfect choice to direct a Predator movie (he even had a minor role in the 1987 movie) and there are instances where you see glimpses of the movie that could have been. When the action is actually intelligible, it’s pretty good, gory fun. As well as delivering some solid action, the movie also gets some pretty entertaining performances out of its actors, most notably Brown who plays the immature, obnoxious Traegar with the demented glee of a bloodthirsty, die-hard 80s action movie fanboy who couldn’t wait until the bullets started firing. His motivation is an unknown entity, as with most of these characters, but at least he’s a lot of fun to watch. Rhodes and Key also have some good moments and feel right at home playing these happy-go-lucky psychopaths delivering Black’s trademark zingers. I’m less convinced by Jane’s Baxley; the movie appears to making a sincere effort to be more inclusive by giving one of its character Tourettes, and yet all of the jokes that emerge from this trait are at his expense so I’m not sure what exactly they were going for. The movie runs into a similar problem with Rory and the apparent insinuation that his autism is some kind of evolutionary superpower. The weakest link though is Holbrook who, between this movie and Narcos, I’ve yet to be convinced by as a leading man. Here he’s playing your typically tough, bland, noble-hearted jerk without any of the charisma that Schwarzenegger and Glover brought back when they helmed this franchise.

The movie has plenty of cool ideas, as in one scene where Black pays tribute to E.T. by having Rory go out trick-or-treating wearing the Predator’s mask or the scene where Traegar explains to Dr. Bracket why they opted to call a murderous alien who hunts for sport a ‘Predator’, but they are few and far in between. The movie has far too many ideas that don’t work; there are sub-plots that don’t go anywhere, jokes that don’t land, motivations that never manifest, and elements that feel like they were added arbitrarily without any clarity or purpose. Black bungles what should have been a match made in heaven, making for a movie that neither excites, amuses nor moves. It’s tempting to suppose that much of what went wrong with this movie could be attributed to studio meddling and forced franchising (and, yes, there are certainly parts of the movie, including a stupid ending, that indicate the studio has every intention of franchising this property), but Black’s questionable judgement in the scandal that emerged around this picture suggests to me that the movie had plenty of problems of its own. The Predator is an ill-executed mess of a movie that never managed to figure out where it wanted to go or what it wanted to be.

★★

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The Nice Guys

Cast: Russell Crowe, Ryan Gosling, Angourie Rice, Matt Bomer, Margaret Qualley, Keith David, Kim Basinger

Director: Shane Black

Writers: Shane Black, Anthony Bagarozzi


My experience with Shane Black’s work was minimal prior to watching this film. The only movie of his that I had ever seen before was the divisive Iron Man 3, a perplexing but sometimes entertaining movie. I now understand that The Nice Guys as a concept falls more within his wheelhouse and marks a sort of return to basics for him. Based on what I’ve heard about his movies Black is more in his element when depicting unlikely duos dealing with sex, murder and mystery in tongue-in-cheek movies that blend comedy, violence and vulgarity. This film in particular is a neo-noir and has thus been compared to his directorial debut Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, a film I’ve yet to see. There’s an intricate mystery, a dubious setting, colourful characters and a strongly defined visual style. The Nice Guys is also a black comedy though and so it does as exemplary a job of parodying these tropes as it does of duplicating them.

In 1977 Los Angeles hapless private investigator Holland March (Ryan Gosling) is hired to look into the death of a famous porn star. The trail leads him to pursue a girl called Amelia Kutner (Margaret Qualley). This lead brings him into direct conflict with the hard as nails Jackson Healy (Russell Crowe), an enforcer hired by Amelia to prevent others from looking for her. When Amelia goes missing however Healy realises that he needs to team up with March to find her before the hired thugs Blue Face (Beau Knapp) and Older Guy (Keith David) do. Assisting them is March’s daughter Holly (Angourie Rice), a bright young girl with a strong moral compass to keep her father’s in check. What they discover is an elaborate conspiracy with twists around every corner encompassing a wide variety of sleazy and notorious characters.

If this film is demonstrable of the type of movies that Black usually creates, then I am definitely looking forward to checking out the rest of his filmography. In this movie he exhibits a distinctive style that is both entertaining and fascinating to watch. As opposed to the grim and ruthless violence of the classic noir movies that have so clearly influenced him Black favours a more awkward, comedic form of violence. It is a style that allows for randomness, absurdity and luck to be key factors in the story without seeming unwarranted. It is also a style that allows for a funny and entertaining means of establishing and furthering character, setting and story. Early on in the film there is a scene where March attempts to break through the glass pane of a door to unlock it from the inside only to horrifically cut himself on the broken glass. As well as being humorous this scene enables us to better understand the viciousness of 1970’s LA, the sad inadequacy of this character, and the random and pitiless nature of violence in this universe. Black’s use of this style is so skilful that he maintains a degree of unpredictability in this film. The characters walk and stumble their way through the story in equal measure and, when chance occurs, we never know whether it will for the protagonists or against them.

The unlikely duo that Gosling and Crowe form in this film is an awesome one, made by possible by strong performances and chemistry. March shows himself to be both shameless and inept as we see him often disregarding his morals for a paycheck and dropping the ball on many an occasion, usually at the worst possible moment. However this pathetic character is one that he has created from misfortune and self-pity as we learn from the occasional glimpses we see of a less useless, less unprincipled version of himself. While March wallows in his inadequacy Healy actively seeks to better himself. He does what he does because he’s good at beating people up but maintains standards, limits and rationale in his work… for the most part at least. Both characters are broken in their own ways but, like all unlikely duos, they come together out of necessity and discover better versions of themselves in their partnership. Helping them to get there is Holly, played terrifically by Angourie Rice, who grounds them both with her level-headedness and reliability.

The script could’ve used a little polish and some tighter editing might have allowed some of the weaker jokes to work a little better but The Nice Guys is, all things considered, a wildly entertaining movie. The characters are crazy and memorable. The 1970’s look is gorgeous and stylish. The action is hilarious and well choreographed. In an age where visual comedy is almost a lost art, Black’s expert use of slapstick is very welcome and greatly appreciated. Like most good film noirs The Nice Guys boasts of a convoluted yet engaging story, intriguing characters and an irresistibly strong sense of mood and tone. Throw in some of Black’s wicked sense of humour and you have a thoroughly enjoyable movie that succeeds in being stylish, thrilling and funny all at once. That is not an easy mix to pull off.

★★★★